Sophora davidii (Franch.) Skeels

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sophora davidii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sophora/sophora-davidii/). Accessed 2022-05-24.

Genus

Synonyms

  • S. moorcroftiana var. davidii Franch.
  • S. viciifolia Hance, not Salisb.

Glossary

appressed
Lying flat against an object.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sophora davidii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sophora/sophora-davidii/). Accessed 2022-05-24.

A deciduous shrub of rounded habit, from 6 to 10 ft high, and as much through, the young branchlets covered with greyish down, the year-old branches more or less spiny. Leaves pinnate, 112 to 212 in. long, with seven to ten pairs of leaflets, which are 14 to 38 in. long, about 18 in. wide, oval or obovate, with silky appressed hairs beneath. Racemes terminal on short twigs, produced from the buds of the previous year’s shoots, 2 to 212 in. long. Flowers pea-flower-shaped; petals bluish white; calyx 18 in. long, downy, short-toothed, violet-blue. Pod 2 to 212 in. long, about 16 in. wide, downy, one- to four-seeded, constricted between the seeds. Bot. Mag., t. 7883.

Native of China in the provinces of Yunnan, Szechwan, and Hupeh, up to 13,500 ft. It was introduced in 1897 to Kew, where it has grown well, and proved to be one of the most charming of Chinese shrubs, the branches being loaded with the blue and white racemes in June, their beauty greatly enhanced by the elegant fern-like foliage. It requires a good loamy soil, and a site exposed to full sunshine. According to Henry, in the elevated regions where it grows, it often covers large tracts of barren country, just as gorse docs in Britain. It is propagated by cuttings made of young shoots with a heel of old wood, in July and August, and placed in a gently heated frame.

Nearly related to S. davidii is S. Moorcroftiana (Benth.) Baker, with similar foliage and habit, but which is more spiny, more downy, has smaller leaflets, yellow flowers, and a longer more slender calyx. Native of the drier parts of the Himalaya from Nepal westwards.