Sophora flavescens Ait.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sophora flavescens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sophora/sophora-flavescens/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

Genus

Glossary

ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
panicle
A much-branched inflorescence. paniculate Having the form of a panicle.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
raceme
Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.
synonym
(syn.) (botanical) An alternative or former name for a taxon usually considered to be invalid (often given in brackets). Synonyms arise when a taxon has been described more than once (the prior name usually being the one accepted as correct) or if an article of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature has been contravened requiring the publishing of a new name. Developments in taxonomic thought may be reflected in an increasing list of synonyms as generic or specific concepts change over time.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sophora flavescens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sophora/sophora-flavescens/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

Originally described by Aiton in the Hortus Kewensis, vol. ii., p. 43, in 1789, this species has since appeared at intervals, but has never obtained a secure footing in gardens. It is merely sub-shrubby with us, and thrusts up during the growing season shoots 3 ft or more long, which are, as a rule, cut back to ground-level in winter. The pinnate leaves are 6 to 9 in. long, with up to nineteen narrowly ovate leaflets 112 to 212 in. long. Flowers yellowish white, 12 in. long, borne during July and August on a terminal cylindrical raceme or panicle up to 1 ft in length. The pods are 2 to 212 in. long and carry one to five seeds.

Native of China, where it has been collected by Delavay, Henry, Wilson, Forrest and others; also of Formosa. The shoots are really semi-herbaceous and too soft to survive the winters of our average climate, so that it forms in time a woody stool which produces gradually weaker shoots and finally succumbs. In W. Hupeh and E. Szechwan, where Wilson found it a shrub 6 ft high, he describes it as very common in sandy places.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

The species, at least in a broad sense, also occurs in Japan, whence came the type of the synonymous name S. angustifolia Sieb. & Zucc. Another synonym of this species is S. kronei Hance.