Sorbaria tomentosa (Lindl.) Rehd.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sorbaria tomentosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sorbaria/sorbaria-tomentosa/). Accessed 2022-05-24.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Schizonotus tomentosus Lindl.
  • Spiraea lindleyana Wall. ex Loud.
  • Sorbaria lindleyana (Wall.) Maxim.

Glossary

glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Sorbaria tomentosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/sorbaria/sorbaria-tomentosa/). Accessed 2022-05-24.

A shrub of graceful spreading habit, up to 20 ft high; branches very pithy, green, glabrous. Leaves 10 to 18 in. long, pinnate, consisting of eleven to twenty-three leaflets, which are lanceolate or ovate-lanceolate, 2 to 412 in. long, 12 to 112 in. wide (the terminal one often larger and pinnately lobed); usually deeply and doubly toothed, glabrous above, furnished with loose, simple hairs beneath, especially about the midrib and veins. Flowers ivory white, scarcely 14 in. wide, produced in terminal pyramidal, branching panicles 1 to 112 ft long and 8 to 12 in. through; flower-stalks downy.

Native of the Himalaya from Nepal westward, and of Afghanistan and W. Pakistan; it was introduced to Britain by Dr Royle and was flowering in the Horticultural Society’s garden at Chiswick by 1840. A very handsome, robust shrub, it is now less cultivated than its ally S. aitchisonii, from which it differs in its downy flower-stalks, and in the leaflets being broader, doubly toothed, and hairy beneath. From S. sorbifolia it differs in its strong spreading habit.