Stauntonia hexaphylla (Thunb.) Decne.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Stauntonia hexaphylla' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/stauntonia/stauntonia-hexaphylla/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

Synonyms

  • Rajania hexaphylla Thunb.

Other taxa in genus

    Glossary

    compound
    Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
    androdioecious
    With only male or only hermaphrodite flowers on individual plants.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    ovate
    Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
    raceme
    Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.
    unisexual
    Having only male or female organs in a flower.

    References

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    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Stauntonia hexaphylla' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/stauntonia/stauntonia-hexaphylla/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

    An evergreen climbing shrub, whose main stem is sometimes 4 or 5 in. thick near the base. Leaves long-stalked, compound, consisting of three to seven leaflets radiating from a common centre. Leaflets ovate to elliptical, acutely pointed, the side ones usually oblique, of leathery texture, glabrous, 2 to 5 in. long; stalks 1 to 2 in. long. Flowers fragrant, unisexual, produced three to seven together in a raceme, white tinged with violet, 34 in. across; they have six fleshy sepals, but no petals; the males with six stamens, the females with three ovaries. Fruits of the size of a walnut, purple, sweet and watery, eaten by the Japanese.

    Native of S. Korea, Japan and the Ryukyus; introduced in 1874. In foliage it is one of the most handsome of climbers, hardy on a south or west wall, but growing most luxuriantly in the milder parts. Fruits have been borne by female plants in the absence of a male, which suggests that this species is not completely dioecious. It received an Award of Merit when exhibited in flower from Wakehurst Place, Sussex, in 1960.