Suaeda vera Forskål ex J. F. Gmel.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Suaeda vera' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/suaeda/suaeda-vera/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

Genus

Synonyms

  • S. fruticosa of many authors, not Forskål

Other taxa in genus

    Glossary

    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    linear
    Strap-shaped.

    References

    There are no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Suaeda vera' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/suaeda/suaeda-vera/). Accessed 2022-05-25.

    A sub-evergreen shrub, 3 or 4 ft high, with glabrous, erect branches. Leaves alternate, linear, nearly cylindrical, fleshy, 14 to 35 in. long, blue-green, borne at very close intervals on the stem. Flowers small, green, stalkless, one-third as long as the leaves, produced during July in the leaf-axils of the current year’s shoots, either singly or two or three together, insignificant.

    Native of the maritime districts of S. and W. Europe, including some parts of the east and south coasts of Britain, and of N. Africa. It has rather a heath-like aspect, with its slender, erect stems and closely set, short leaves – but the latter are, of course, much more thick and fleshy. The shrub has no beauty of flower, but the habit and foliage are sufficiently interesting and graceful for it to be planted in brackish places, or in positions exposed to salt spray where comparatively few shrubs will thrive. It succeeds well in sandy soil, and can be increased by cuttings placed under a handlight. If it gets too ungainly in form it should be pruned back in spring, but the semi-woody shoots are frequently cut back by winter frost.