Symphoricarpos guadalupensis Correll

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Credits

Owen Johnson (2021)

Recommended citation
Johnson, O. (2021), 'Symphoricarpos guadalupensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/symphoricarpos/symphoricarpos-guadalupensis/). Accessed 2021-06-20.

Glossary

glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
taxon
(pl. taxa) Group of organisms sharing the same taxonomic rank (family genus species infraspecific variety).

Credits

Owen Johnson (2021)

Recommended citation
Johnson, O. (2021), 'Symphoricarpos guadalupensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/symphoricarpos/symphoricarpos-guadalupensis/). Accessed 2021-06-20.

A shrub; shoots slender, red-brown, glabrous; older bark thinly fibrous; buds glabrous. Leaves oval to elliptic, to 15 × 9 mm, apex rounded, margin often with coarse teeth or lobules above the middle; glabrous. Pedicels thick, c. 1.5 mm long; floral bracts ovate-concave, c. 1.5 mm long; calyx 1.8 mm long, the lobes broadly rounded; corolla bell-shaped, 3–4 mm long, with broadly-rounded concave lobes. (Correll 1968).

Distribution  United States Texas; found before 1968 at the head of South McKittrick Canyon in the Guadalupe Mountains National Park.

Habitat Limestone rocks

Conservation status Data deficient (DD)

Symphoricarpos guadalupensis was found and collected by D.S. Correll at the head of South McKittrick Canyon in western Texas and described by him in 1968 (Correll 1968), differing from the surrounding plants of S. palmeri (syn. S. rotundifolius) in being entirely glabrous. It has been universally accepted since that time as a good species, though Correll’s description is incomplete (he did not observe fruit) and S. rotundifolius, as understood by Plants of the World Online (Plants of the World Online 2021), is a variable taxon including nearly glabrous forms. No-one appears to have collected S. guadalupensis since Correll (Poole, Carr & Price 2007).