Symplocos tinctoria

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Symplocos tinctoria' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/symplocos/symplocos-tinctoria/). Accessed 2020-10-29.

Genus

Common Names

  • Horse Sugar
  • Sweetleaf

Synonyms

  • Hopea tinctoria L.

Other species in genus

Glossary

axillary
Situated in an axil.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Symplocos tinctoria' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/symplocos/symplocos-tinctoria/). Accessed 2020-10-29.

This native of the south-eastern United States was introduced to Britain in 1780 and several times later, but is not hardy. It is a small semi-evergreen tree, whose sweet-tasting leaves are greedily eaten by sheep and cattle. The fragrant flowers are borne in spring in almost sessile axillary clusters on the previous season’s wood, which is leafless at flowering-time in the northern forms, and are followed by oval, yellowish brown fruits. It might prove hardier if re-introduced from the northern end of its range or from a high altitude (according to Sargent it ascends to 4,000 ft on the Blue Ridge of North and South Carolina).

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