Tilia x flavescens A. Braun ex Doll

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Credits

Owen Johnson & Julian Sutton (2020)

Recommended citation
Johnson, O. & Sutton, J. (2020), 'Tilia x flavescens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/tilia/tilia-x-flavescens/). Accessed 2020-11-26.

Genus

Glossary

hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).

References

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Credits

Owen Johnson & Julian Sutton (2020)

Recommended citation
Johnson, O. & Sutton, J. (2020), 'Tilia x flavescens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/tilia/tilia-x-flavescens/). Accessed 2020-11-26.

A hybrid, intermediate in features between its parents T. americana and T. cordata.

Habitat A hybrid found only in cultivation.

USDA Hardiness Zone 3-7

RHS Hardiness Rating H7

Hybrids between Tilia americana and T. cordata are liable to occur whenever both species are grown together in areas with warm summers, just as with T. americana × platyphyllos (T. × flaccida). T. × flavescens was described in 1843 from a putative hybrid in the park at Karlsruhe, Germany (Pigott 2012): the cross has clearly occurred on both sides of the Atlantic.


'Dropmore'

Closely resembling T. americana, but faster growing than either parent and resistant to Linden Mite (Jacobson 1996). This is an upright, large leaved and very hardy tree, valuable in the prairie provinces and states of North America (Zone 2a is claimed – Millcreek Nursery 2020). Introduced 1956 by Skinner’s Nursery, Dropmore, Manitoba (Santamour & McArdle 1985) and still in the Canadian trade.


'Glenleven'

Synonyms
Tilia cordata 'Glenleven'

Fast-growing and upright, with a fairly narrow crown (Jacobson 1996; van den Berk Nurseries 2020). Selected by Sheridan Nurseries, Ontario, 1963 from open-pollinated seedlings of T. cordata (Santamour & McArdle 1985), and available in the North American and European trade.


'Spaethii'

Fast-growing and upright, broadly resembling T. cordata except in its larger leaves and in the presence of staminodes (Bean 1981; Krüssmann 1986; Pigott 2012). Largely of historical interest, and of uncertain origin, it was distributed by the Späth nursery, Berlin from 1912 (Santamour & McArdle 1985), also by Simon-Louis Frères in France (Bean 1981). The late Harry Hay obtained a specimen labelled ‘Spaethii’ from the Netherlands in 1991, for his collection in Surrey: what is probably the same tree had grown vigorously to 12 m by 2016 (Tree Register 2018).


'Wascana'

An open-pollinated seedling of ‘Dropmore’, even hardier, faster growing and more widely branching. Selected in 1978 by W.G. Ronald at the Morden Research Station, Manitoba (Santamour & McArdle 1985). ‘Not common’ (Jacobson 1996).