× Cuprocyparis notabilis (A.F. Mitchell) Farjon

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'× Cuprocyparis notabilis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/x-cuprocyparis/x-cuprocyparis-notabilis/). Accessed 2021-09-26.

Common Names

  • Alice Holt Cypress
  • Noble Cypress

Synonyms

  • (Cupressus arizonica var. glabra × Xanthocyparis nootkatensis) × Cupressocyparis notabilis A.F. Mitchell

Other taxa in genus

Glossary

strobilus
Cone. Used here to indicate male pollen-producing structure in conifers which may or may not be cone-shaped.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'× Cuprocyparis notabilis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/x-cuprocyparis/x-cuprocyparis-notabilis/). Accessed 2021-09-26.

Tree to 20 m or more. Bark reddish brown to purple, scaly or flaky with patches of several different colours adjacent to each other. Crown conical, broader and more open than in ×C. leylandii. Major branches ascending. Foliage branches flattened, pendulous, yellowish green with brown tinge, later becoming violet. Leaves blue-green with slight greyish bloom, decussate, imbricate, apex acute. Male strobili terminal, solitary, ovoid, yellowish. Seed cones globose, 12–18 mm diameter, cone blue-green with whitish bloom, ripening to dark brown, persistent after seed dispersal. Seed scales in two to four decussate pairs, valvate. Farjon 2005c. Distribution Only in cultivation. USDA Hardiness Zone 6 (?). Illustration NT302. Cross-references S198, K101.

The hybrid tree ×Cuprocyparis notabilis resulted from a chance cross in the 1950s between Cupressus arizonica var. glabra and Xanthocyparis nootkatensis at Leighton Hall, Powys, where its older half-sibling ×Cuprocyparis leylandii had appeared previously. Fortunately it is less common than this latter, as it also forms a tall shaggy column with pendulous shoots. A redeeming feature is the attractive mottled bark inherited from its mother. There are specimens of 15 m and over in several UK arboreta, the champion recognised by TROBI being a specimen at Westonbirt of 22 m in 2001. Another very fine tree at Wakehurst Place that has not been measured recently must, however, be almost as tall as this.