× Mahoberberis neubertii (Baumann) Schneid.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'× Mahoberberis neubertii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/x-mahoberberis/x-mahoberberis-neubertii/). Accessed 2021-11-29.

Synonyms

  • Berberis neubertii Baumann
  • M. neubertii var. ilicifolia Schneid.
  • Berberis ilicifolia Hort., not Forst.

Other taxa in genus

Glossary

hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.
trifoliolate
With three leaflets.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'× Mahoberberis neubertii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/x-mahoberberis/x-mahoberberis-neubertii/). Accessed 2021-11-29.

An evergreen, or partially evergreen shrub, of loose, open habit, 4 to 6 ft high. Leaves very variable; sometimes simple, obovate, 112 to 3 in. long, with fine marginal teeth like those of Berberis vulgaris; other stiff, hard, and holly-like, with a few large spiny teeth resembling the leaflets of Mahonia; others trifoliolate or pinnate. Flowers and fruits not seen.

A hybrid between Mahonia aquifolium (the seed-bearer) and Berberis vulgaris, which appeared in Baumann’s once famous nursery at Bolwyller, in Alsace, about 1850. It has but little to recommend it as a garden plant, being in my experience a sterile, flowerless mule. As a scientific curiosity it is interesting, for it unites two genera, although remarkably distinct from either of its parents. The form with spiny-toothed leaves like holly is often erroneously called B. ilicifolia.